top of page
Search
  • snitzoid

Are Americans divided about climate change?


EV cars generate more pollution to manuf than gas-burning vehicles. It takes 4-5 years to pay off that carbon penalty. Wind and Solar need natural gas backup systems and are a joke. China and India pollute more than the US, and their carbon footprint is growing exponentially while our subsidies.


Am I worried? No, I'm sniffing glue.



What the data says about Americans’ views of climate change

BY ALEC TYSON, CARY FUNK AND BRIAN KENNEDY, PEW RESEARCH


Activists display prints replicating solar panels during a rally to mark Earth Day at Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C., on April 23, 2022. (Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP File)

Activists display prints replicating solar panels during a rally to mark Earth Day at Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C., on April 23, 2022. (Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP File)

A recent report from the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has underscored the need for international action to avoid increasingly severe climate impacts in the years to come. Steps outlined in the report, and by climate experts, include major reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from sectors such as energy production and transportation.


But how do Americans feel about climate change, and what steps do they think the United States should take to address it? Here are eight charts that illustrate Americans’ views on the issue, based on recent Pew Research Center surveys.


How we did this


A majority of Americans support the U.S. becoming carbon neutral by 2050. Nearly seven-in-ten Americans (69%) favor the U.S. taking steps to become carbon neutral by 2050, a goal outlined by President Joe Biden at the outset of his administration. The same share of Americans (69%) say the U.S. should prioritize developing renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, over expanding the production of oil, coal and natural gas. Carbon neutrality means releasing no more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than is removed.



Nine-in-ten Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents support the U.S. taking steps to become carbon neutral by 2050. Among Republicans and Republican leaners, 44% support this goal and 53% oppose it. But there are important differences by age within the GOP: Two-thirds of Republicans under age 30 (67%) favor the U.S. taking steps to become carbon neutral, but about the same share of Republicans ages 65 and older (64%) oppose this.


Climate experts say it’s necessary to significantly reduce carbon emissions in order to slow the pace of climate change. Energy production and transportation are two high-emission sectors where efforts are being made to reduce emissions.


Americans are reluctant to phase out fossil fuels altogether, but younger adults are more open to it. Americans are wary of relying exclusively on renewable energy sources. About three-in-ten (31%) say the U.S. should completely phase out oil, coal and natural gas. More than twice as many (67%) say the country should use a mix of energy sources, including fossil fuels and renewables.



While the public is generally reluctant to phase out fossil fuels altogether, younger adults are more open to this idea. Among Americans ages 18 to 29, 50% say the U.S. should use a mix of energy sources, including fossil fuels, while about as many (48%) say the U.S. should exclusively use renewables.


There are also age differences within both political parties. Among Democrats and Democratic leaners, a majority of those ages 18 to 29 (62%) favor phasing out fossil fuels entirely, compared with about four-in-ten Democrats ages 50 and older. Republicans of all age groups back continuing to use a mix of energy sources, including oil, coal and natural gas. However, about one-in-five Republicans ages 18 to 29 (22%) say the U.S. should phase out fossil fuels altogether, compared with fewer than one-in-ten Republicans 50 and older.


There are multiple potential routes to carbon neutrality in the U.S. All involve major reductions to carbon emissions in sectors such as energy and transportation by increasing the use of things like wind and solar power and electric vehicles. There are also ways to potentially remove carbon from the atmosphere and store it, such as capturing it directly from the air or using trees and algae to facilitate carbon sequestration.


The public supports the federal government incentivizing wind and solar energy production. In many sectors, including energy and transportation, federal incentives and regulations significantly influence investment and development.



Two-thirds of Americans think the federal government should encourage domestic production of wind and solar power. Just 7% say the government should discourage this, while 26% think it should neither encourage nor discourage it.


Views are more mixed on how the federal government should approach other activities that would reduce carbon emissions. On balance, more Americans think the government should encourage than discourage the use of electric vehicles and nuclear power production, though sizable shares say it should not exert an influence either way.


When it comes to oil and gas drilling, Americans’ views are also closely divided: 34% think the government should encourage drilling, while 30% say it should discourage this and 35% say it should do neither. Coal mining is the one activity included in the survey where public sentiment is negative on balance: More say the federal government should discourage than encourage coal mining (39% vs. 21%), while 39% say it should do neither.


Americans see room for multiple actors – including corporations and the federal government – to do more to address the impacts of climate change. Two-thirds of Americans say large businesses and corporations are doing too little to reduce the effects of climate change. Far fewer say they are doing about the right amount (21%) or too much (10%).



Majorities also say their state elected officials (58%) and the energy industry (55%) are doing too little to address climate change. In a separate Center survey conducted in May 2022, a similar share of Americans (58%) said the federal government should do more to reduce the effects of global climate change.


When it comes to their own efforts, about half of Americans (51%) think they are doing about the right amount as an individual to help reduce the effects of climate change. However, about four-in-ten (43%) say they are doing too little.


Democrats and Republicans have grown further apart over the last decade in their assessments of the threat posed by climate change. Overall, a majority of U.S. adults (54%) describe climate change as a major threat to the country’s well-being. This share is down slightly from 2020 but remains higher than in the early 2010s.




Nearly eight-in-ten Democrats (78%) now describe climate change as a major threat to the country’s well-being, up from about six-in-ten (58%) a decade ago. By contrast, about one-in-four Republicans (23%) consider climate change a major threat, a share that’s almost identical to 10 years ago.


Concern over climate change has also risen internationally, as shown by separate Pew Research Center polling across 19 countries. People in many advanced economies express higher levels of concern than Americans. For instance, 81% of French adults and 73% of Germans describe climate change as a major threat.


Climate change is a lower priority for Americans than other national issues. While a majority of Americans view climate change as a major threat, it is a lower priority than issues such as strengthening the economy and reducing health care costs.


Overall, 37% of Americans say addressing climate change should be a top priority for the president and Congress in 2023, and another 34% say it’s an important but lower priority. This ranks climate change 17th out of 21 national issues included in a Center survey from January.


As with views of the threat that climate change poses, there’s a striking contrast between how Republicans and Democrats prioritize the issue. For Democrats, it falls in the top half of priority issues, and 59% call it a top priority. By comparison, among Republicans, it ranks second to last, and just 13% describe it as a top priority.




In previous Pew Research Center studies, partisan gaps on climate change have often been widest on questions such as this one that measure the salience or importance of an issue. The gaps are more modest when it comes to some specific climate policies. For example, majorities of Republicans and Democrats alike say they would favor a proposal to provide a tax credit to businesses for developing technologies for carbon capture and storage.


Perceptions of local climate impacts vary by Americans’ political affiliation and whether they believe that climate change is a serious problem. A majority of Americans (61%) say that global climate change is affecting their local community either a great deal or some. About four-in-ten (39%) see little or no impact in their own community.




The perception that the effects of climate change are happening close to home is one factor that could drive public concern and calls for action on the issue. But perceptions are tied more strongly to people’s beliefs about climate change – and their partisan affiliation – than to local conditions.


For example, Americans living in the Pacific region – which includes California, Washington, Oregon, Hawaii and Alaska – are more likely than those in other areas of the country to say that climate change is having a great deal of impact locally. While Democrats in the Pacific region are more likely than Democrats in other areas to say they are seeing effects of climate change where they live, Republicans in the Pacific region are no more likely than Republicans in other areas to say that climate change is affecting their local community.


Previous Pew Research Center surveys show that nearly all Democrats believe climate change is at least a somewhat serious problem, and a large majority believe that humans play a role in it. Republicans are much less likely to hold these beliefs, but views within the GOP do vary significantly by age and ideology. Younger Republicans and those who describe their views as moderate or liberal are much more likely than older and more conservative Republicans to describe climate change as at least a somewhat serious problem and to say human activity plays a role.


Democrats are also more likely than Republicans to report experiencing extreme weather events in their area over the past year – such as intense storms and floods, long periods of hot weather or droughts – and to see these events as connected with climate change.


Three-quarters of Americans support U.S. participation in international efforts to reduce the effects of climate change. Americans offer broad support for international engagement on climate change: 75% say they support U.S. participation in international efforts to reduce the effects of climate change.




Still, there’s little consensus on how current U.S. efforts stack up against those of other large economies. About one-in-three Americans (36%) think the U.S. is doing less than other large economies, while nearly equal shares say the U.S. is doing more (32%) or about as much (31%). The U.S. is the second-largest carbon dioxide emitter, contributing about 13.5% of the global total.


When asked what they think the right balance of responsibility is, a narrow majority of Americans (54%) say the U.S. should do about as much as other large economies to reduce the effects of climate change, while about three-in-ten (31%) think the U.S. should do more than others.


However, while Americans favor international cooperation on climate change in general terms, their support has its limits. For instance, about three-in-five (59%) say the U.S. does not have a responsibility to provide financial assistance to developing countries to help them build renewable energy sources.


In recent years, the UN conference on climate change has grappled with how wealthier nations should assist developing countries in dealing with climate change. The most recent convening in fall 2022, known as COP27, established a “loss and damage” fund for vulnerable countries impacted by climate change.


Note: This is an update of a post originally published April 22, 2022. Here are the questions used for this analysis, along with responses, and its methodology.


Topics Political IssuesEnvironment & ClimateClimate, Energy & EnvironmentClimate ChangeEnergyPartisanship & Issues

9 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Florida Named as Shark Attack Capital of the World

Another attention grabbing stunt by DeSantis to promote his state. Is perfectly clear that the Australian sharks off the Great Barrier Reef are better by almost ever metric; bigger, stronger, faster,

The fatal flaw in public education.

Ironic most other affluent nations give almost all families school choice (like Charter schools). Not here. In many parts of the US, poor neighborhoods are plagued with smaller budgets for public edu

Comments


Post: Blog2_Post
bottom of page