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The 10 great questions. About going green?

One additional thought. Most drivers on average log about 60 miles per day. Toyota hybrids will soon be able to travel that distance in EV mode with a gas backup available. Producing these cars produces little more pollution (lighter smaller batteries) vs EVs like Tesla which has a pollution premium that takes 4-5 years to pay off (huge batteries the production of which pollutes).


Why isn't our government offering rebates for hybrids as well? In fact, hybrids are at present for the average driver far better for the environment.


BTW, not saying they're for everybody, but a better option for many considering EV.


Ten Questions to Ask Yourself About the Transition to Renewables

The effort to reduce dependence on fossil fuels raises all sorts of issues that won’t be easy to address. But they demand our attention.


Should the U.S. speed up the energy transition by becoming more dependent on foreign countries for critical materials for solar panels, batteries and the like?


Should the U.S. speed up the energy transition by becoming more dependent on foreign countries for critical materials for solar panels, batteries and the like?


ZACK WITTMAN FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

July 22, 2023 11:00 am ET


The transition from fossil fuels to cleaner energy will involve disruptive changes, raising questions about which technologies to choose, how fast to move, the government’s role, and who will bear the costs and risks.


Here are 10 questions to ponder. The point isn’t to come up with a right or wrong answer but to think about some of the questions being asked today.


  1. A homeowner objects to a wind farm that’s visible from his window. How much of a say should he have? What if so many homeowners object that it becomes impossible to expand wind farms to any great extent?

  2. Advocates for government funding for EVs, solar and the like compare it to insurance—spending money now to reduce the chance that we’ll have to spend even greater amounts in the future to cover the damage caused by storms, drought and other impacts of global warming. Do you find that analogy persuasive? If not, why?

  3. Should the U.S. speed up the energy transition by becoming more dependent on foreign countries for critical materials for solar panels, batteries and the like? Or should it slow the transition until it can build domestic supply chains for these products?

  4. California has a 2035 deadline to phase out gas-car sales. Should the federal government mandate a countrywide phaseout of gas-car sales? If so, how far in the future is reasonable?

  5. Do environmental concerns motivate you to consider buying an electric vehicle? If so, how much more would you be willing to pay for it? Would you buy it for $1,000 more? $5,000? $10,000 or more?

  6. Should poorer countries be able to transition to cleaner power more slowly than richer countries, maybe even increasing their pollution, to improve living conditions? Do you agree with rich countries’ commitments to subsidize the transition for poorer countries?

  7. Should consumers receive incentives to buy electric vehicles? If not, should owners of gas-powered cars pay a fee to account for the environmental damage of their cars?

  8. Should nuclear power play a bigger role in energy production? How big a risk of a catastrophic accident would be acceptable? Would your answer change if the nuclear power plant were to be placed in your town?

  9. Should consumers get to use as much fossil-fuel-created energy as they want, if they can afford it? Do we owe anything to future generations who may be affected by climate changes caused way before their time?

  10. Should developed countries whose past growth has led to climate change compensate poorer countries that are at environmental risk, for instance from flooding? Should specific companies provide such compensation?

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