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Is Zelensky out of touch w reality? Is what's good for him good for NATO?

Hey boss, they're not coming! The cavalry to save the day. The Russians aren't leaving the Donbas, not now not ever. They've won and NATO will soon realize that it's time to "wrap it up" at your expense.


Are they going to keep supplying weaponry? Not if it keeps prolonging a war that's not in their economy interest. The EU is more interested right now in lowering gas/oil prices and getting food supplies running that in protecting the Donbas.


Notice how you've not been allowed to send a single missile into Russia. When your "friends" say it's ok for you to get bombed, but not to return the favor...you need new friends. Except that's nobody wants to be Ukraine's "friend" right now.


Zelensky Asks for Western Help to Push Russia Out of Ukraine Before Winter

Ukrainian president’s appeal to G-7 comes as U.S. says it will supply more military aid and deploy further sanctions against Moscow


By Tarini Parti, Bojan Pancevski and Alex Leary, WSJ

Updated June 27, 2022 6:59 pm ET



TELFS-BUCHEN, Austria—Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky appealed to Group of Seven leaders for more support from allies to push Russia out of newly conquered territories, according to officials present for the video address, as the U.S. said it would provide more military aid for Ukraine and impose new sanctions against Moscow to try to turn the tide of the war ahead of the winter months.


Mr. Zelensky told the G-7 leaders, who are meeting in the German Alps, that the harsh Ukrainian winter would make it more difficult for his troops to defend their positions and maintain supply lines to the front, which stretches over 2,000 kilometers, about 1,200 miles, from the north to the south of the country, officials said. Ukraine aims to push Russia back to the separation line before the February invasion, Mr. Zelensky said Monday, according to these officials.


Mr. Zelensky’s plea for additional help came on a day when Russian missiles hit a shopping mall in central Ukraine while Russia’s forces attempted to surround the last major city in the eastern Luhansk region that is still under Kyiv’s control.


At least 16 people were killed and around 59 injured in the attack on the mall in the city of Kremenchuk, according to Ukraine’s state rescue service. Mr. Zelensky said nearly 1,000 civilians had been inside but that many appeared to have managed to escape when an air-raid siren sounded before the missiles struck.


“This is one of the most brazen terrorist acts in the history of Europe,” Mr. Zelensky said in an address Monday. “Russia became the biggest terrorist organization in the world.”


Russia’s Ministry of Defense hasn’t commented on the attack. A senior Russian diplomat at the United Nations, Dmitry Polyanskiy, said on Twitter that the attack looked like a Ukrainian provocation, without providing any evidence.


In its campaign to halt Russia’s advance, Ukraine is expressing increased concern over the weather. The frozen ground would make it easier for the invading Russian forces to transport tanks, artillery and supplies, Mr. Zelensky told the G-7 leaders.


Jake Sullivan, President Biden’s national-security adviser, declined to give specifics on how Mr. Zelensky characterized the expected difficulties of the war during the winter months but said the Ukrainians wanted to “push the pace” of the operations and assistance “as opposed to letting things just drag out indefinitely.”


“Zelensky was very much focused on trying to ensure that Ukraine is in as advantageous a position on the battlefield as possible in the next months as opposed to the next years because he believes that a grinding conflict is not in the interest of the Ukrainian people, for obvious reasons,” Mr. Sullivan said.


The Ukrainian leader told the G-7 leaders that now wasn’t the moment to negotiate with Russia. “Ukraine will negotiate when it is in a position to, that’s to say when it will have re-established a strong position,” the Ukrainian president said, according to a French official.


The U.S. will provide Ukraine with an advanced medium- to long-range surface-to-air missile defense system for Ukraine, Mr. Sullivan said. Other security assistance includes artillery ammunition and counter-battery radars to address needs expressed by the Ukrainian military.


Mr. Zelensky backed capping the purchase price of Russian oil, according to a statement from his office. G-7 leaders agreed to start work on such a mechanism, which would create a buyers’ cartel of Western nations and their allies, a senior Biden administration official said.


G-7 governments will now task their responsible ministries to develop a model for the cap and there is no date yet on when the caps might come into force. Mr. Sullivan said the delay in figuring out details of the price caps is because of the complexity of the issue.


“The single biggest factor here is this is not something that can be pulled off the shelf as a tried and true method,” he said. “It is a new kind of concept to deal with a particularly novel challenge, which is how to effectively deal with a country that’s selling millions of barrels of oil a day.”


French officials said they supported a cap on oil as well as gas in principle but added that any new sanctions must not lead to a further increase in energy prices. France and its allies should negotiate with other energy exporters to help them increase production, and possibly open the market to countries such as Iran or Venezuela, one senior French official said.


Many G-7 nations have already moved to cut off imports of Russian oil to their own markets, and the European Union has approved a ban on insuring shipments of Russian oil. To try to avoid further price increases that taking more oil off the market could cause, officials have discussed creating a carve-out from the insurance ban for shipments of Russian oil whose price falls under the cap.


Because of its complexity, U.S. and EU officials have been puzzling out some of the specifics of implementing the idea, including how to ensure that shipments comply with the price cap.


U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen has sought a cap for weeks, and called several of her foreign counterparts in recent days to discuss it, according to a person familiar with the talks.


While higher prices for oil and gas have helped Russia weather sanctions, fresh evidence of pain came Monday with news that Moscow defaulted on its foreign debt for the first time since 1918.


Another batch of sanctions expected to be agreed upon this week would target Russian individuals accused of war crimes and human-rights abuses, including those responsible for blocking Kyiv grain exports, the U.S. official said. Additional tariffs will be imposed on Russian goods.


New actions to be announced include imposing blocking sanctions on state-owned defense enterprises and research organizations to limit Russia from replenishing its weapons supply, the U.S. said.


Mr. Biden and G-7 leaders will also seek authority to use revenue from existing tariffs to help the people of Ukraine.


The U.S. will implement a higher tariff rate on more than 570 groups of Russian products worth approximately $2.3 billion to Russia in line with Congress revoking Russia’s trade status, according to a government document distributed Monday.


Further, the U.S. will impose blocking sanctions on private military companies operating in Ukraine and Russian military units “that have been credibly implicated in human rights abuses or violations of international humanitarian law in Ukraine,” the document stated, as well as Russian officials, including mayors and ministers, installed in contested cities.



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