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57% See Depression Ahead. Talk about self absorbed!

Honestly, that's all these morons think about? Don't they understand that inclusiveness, fighting global warming and warm tea is what matters. After I long day, I like to curl up with a cup of Chamomile and have Muffy sit in my lap.


57% See Depression Ahead

Rasmussen Polling

Wednesday, September 28, 2022


With the stock market tumbling, a majority of Americans think it’s likely there’s an economic depression in the future.


The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 57% of American Adults believe it’s likely that, over the next few years, the United States will enter a 1930s-like Depression, including 21% who think a depression is Very Likely. Thirty-two percent (32%) don’t think a depression is likely, and another 12% are not sure. These findings haven’t changed much since May, when 55% said a depression was likely in the next few years. (To see survey question wording, click here.)


After stock prices closed at their lowest level since the COVID-19 pandemic hit in early 2020, one analyst warned this week that “the risk of severe global recession is rising.” Thirty-one percent (31%) of Americans believe the stock market will be lower a year from now, while 29% think it will be higher. Twenty percent (20%) expect the stock market will be about the same a year from now and another 20% are not sure.


Only 24% believe today’s children will be better off than their parents, while 53% don’t think so and 24% are not sure.


(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it’s in the news, it’s in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.


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The survey of 1,000 U.S. American Adults was conducted on September 22 and 25, 2022 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.


More Republicans (72%) than Democrats (47%) or those not affiliated with either major party (54%) believe it is at least somewhat likely the U.S. will enter a 1930s-like depression in the next few years.


Democrats (43%) are more likely than Republicans (21%) or the unaffiliated (24%) to think the stock market will be higher a year from now.


Thirty-one percent (31%) of Democrats, 19% of Republicans and 20% of the unaffiliated say today’s children will be better off than their parents.


Whites (27%) are less likely than blacks (31%) or other minorities (35%) to believe the stock market will be higher a year from now. Fifty-seven percent (57%) of whites and 55% of blacks and other minorities think it is at least somewhat likely the U.S. will enter a 1930s-like depression in the next few years.


Those 65 and older are less likely than younger Americans to expect a depression in the next few years. Men under 40 are most likely to believe stocks will be higher a year from now.


Americans with children at home are more likely than their childless peers to say today’s children will be better off than their parents.


Americans with annual incomes below $50,000 are most likely to think the U.S. will enter a depression in the next few years.


Among those who think the stock market will be lower a year from now, 77% don’t think today’s children will be better off than their parents.


As the use of debit and credit cards increases, fewer Americans now are paying cash for most purchases.


The price of gasoline has decreased significantly in the past two months, but most Americans continue to think they’ll be paying more at the pump in the future.


Additional information from this survey and a full demographic breakdown are available to Platinum Members only.


Please sign up for the Rasmussen Reports daily e-mail update (it’s free) or follow us on Facebook. Let us keep you up to date with the latest public opinion news.

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